Courses

Summer school courses 2018

IMPORTANT!
Because each course lasts for one week, it is possible to participate in one course per week only.

NB! The University of Jyväskylä reserves the right to make changes to the course programme.

Week I: 21 - 25 May 2018

 

Week II: 28 May - 1 June 2018

 

Week III: 4 - 8 June 2018

 

Week IV: 11 - 15 June 2018

 

XSUX1000 Finnish Language and Culture

by Language Centre

ECTS credits: 2

Lecturer: Minna Sorri, MA, Language Centre, University of Jyväskylä

Target group:
 All those interested in Finnish language and culture. No prior knowledge of Finnish required.

Course description: This basic Finnish course focuses on receptive skills, which means understanding simple everyday written and spoken phrases such as signs, newspaper advertisements and announcements. The students will learn simple phrases and greetings so that they can survive in everyday situations and places such as shops, cafes and restaurants. During the classes, we will also study language learning skills and strategies for understanding basic vocabulary and simple written phrases. While studying the language, the students will also learn about the history and specialties of the Finnish language as well as some basic features of Finnish culture. Some cultural visits will be arranged during the course. The students will have a chance to affect the contents of the course.

Mode of study: Daily classes and individual home work

Assessment: Written exam at the end of the course. The course is graded numerically on the scale of 1-5

Timing: 21 - 25 May

Class hours: Mon - Fri 9.15 - 14.00

 

MCE0210 Education in Finland

by Faculty of Education and Psychology

ECTS credits: 3

Lecturers:

Pasi Ikonen, Faculty of Education and Psychology, University of Jyväskylä

Elisa Heimovaara, Faculty of Education and Psychology, University of Jyväskylä

Piia Parviainen, Faculty of Education and Psychology, University of Jyväskylä

Target group: Visiting Bachelor and Master level students interested in Finnish education

Outcomes: Upon completion of the course, the students are able to understand the Finnish system of education, and they can

    • describe different aspects of the Finnish education system

Mode of study: Lectures about Finnish education system (e.g. early childhood education, basic education, special education, adult education, teacher education).  Written assignment.

Literature:

Curricula 2014
(ECEC, Pre-primary and primary education, and upper secondary)

Assessment: 0-5

Timing: 21 - 25 May

 

YTPP2160 Introduction to Management and Leadership   

by Jyväskylä University School of Business and Economics (JSBE)

ECTS credits: 4


Lecturer:
Virpi Malin, PhD, University teacher and pedagogical director, JSBE

Other lecturers to be announced later

Target group: Anybody interested in theoretical and practical understanding of management and leadership in organizations. Suitable for business school students on bachelor-level (students studying at JSBE can gain 6 credits by doing extra assignments for passing YTPP2110, which is in our regular program)

Course description/learning outcomes:

On successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

- describe and use the main concepts and theories of management and leadership

- address and critically evaluate some contemporary concerns in management and business practices

- understand, examine and reflect organizational behavior from individual, group and organizational

  perspectives

- address and reflect the main issues of learning and knowledge creation in organizations

- evaluate the changing nature of business environment culturally and internationally

- integrate ethical values to management and leadership

- evaluate her/his own interest in managerial work

Content:

The course will introduce the main concepts of management and leadership in organization:

- Development of management theory

- Managerial work and leadership in organizations

- Individuals and groups in organization

- Organizational environment and culture

- International business

- Critical thinking in management and leadership

- Arts-based initiatives in management

Mode of study: Workshop (including lectures and reflexive individual/group work)

Assessment: Active participation, group/individual assignments (including pre-assignment – instructions to be given to registered students). Evaluation criteria to be discussed during the first session.

Course material: Stephen P. Robbins, Tim Judge: Essentials of Organizational Behavior, Global Edition, Dawsonera e-Book collection, additional material to be given during the workshop

Timing: 21 - 25 May

Class hours:
Monday 12-16
Tuesday 10-15:30
Wednesday 10-15:30

Thursday 9-14:30

 

Everyday Life in New Media – Online Ethnography as a Research Method

by Department of History and Ethnology

ECTS credits: 5

Lecturer: Riitta Hänninen, PhD

Field: Cultural Anthropology

Level: Advanced

Target group: Students in human and social sciences, other related fields of science

Course description:

New media, such as apps, blogs, forums, Instagram and Twitter, have in many ways revolutionised the way people perceive their everyday lives, social relations and the world in general during the past decade. According to one of the guiding principles of online ethnography, virtual worlds and new media can be utilised both as an object of a study as well as a tool or a method to grasp reality even outside the “virtual”. Following the lines of this thought, the aim of this course is to get familiar with the multiple ways people use new media and especially to learn how to gather qualitative research data by using online ethnography.

The main topics of the course include the basic data sets and concepts involved in online ethnography, the theoretical framework of the method and using online ethnography in practice. There are also questions related to the ethics of online ethnography that will be discussed throughout the course.

Objectives: The goal of the course is to introduce the students with the essential concepts and practices of online ethnography.

Completion mode: Lectures, group work, learning assignments/essays

5 credits = full participation on the course, group work, learning assignments + 2 essays

Assessment: Grading scale 1–5 (0=fail, 1=satisfactory, 3=good, 4= very good, 5 = excellent). The criteria of the assessment will be discussed in detail at the beginning of the course.

Timing: 21 - 25 May

 

LYTA508 Organization and Role of Sport in the EU and its Member States

by Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences

ECTS credits: Either 2 or 4. Students will write a learning log that incorporates the relevant issues discussed in the class: 5-6 pages for 2 ECTS credits or 10-12 pages for 4 ECTS credits.

Lecturers:

  • Anna-Katriina Salmikangas, PhD, Senior Researcher, Department of the Sport Sciences, University of Jyväskylä

  • Other lecturers to be announced later

    Target group: This course is ideal for Bachelor level students of e.g. sport management, organizational studies, leadership and European studies.

    Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this course, student is able to:

  • identify various EU organizations from a sport perspective and understand the role of sport in the EU

  • recognize the role of sport at international, national and local level

  • apply the knowledge about the different ways of organizing sport in different countries in the settings of his/her home country

  • create a project plan for applying funding for promoting sports

    Content:

  • EU structures, funding and development issues

  • Progress of the White Paper on sport and the “Pierre De Coubertin” action plan, Lisbon Treaty and sport related articles

  • Preparing a project plan for one of the EU calls for sports 

    Mode of study: Lectures 24 hours, practical exercises, and a written assignment to be completed after the course. Learning will be facilitated through discussion, computer-based research, group works and presentations.

    Assessment: Active participation in the lectures and writing a learning log on topics related to the course. Students will write a learning log that incorporates the relevant issues discussed in the class: 5-6 pages for 2 ECTS credits or 10-12 pages for 4 ECTS credits.

    Grading: 0-5. (active participation 20%, group work 40% and learning log 40%)

    Timing:  21 – 25 May

    Class hours: Mon – Wed 9.00-15.00, Fri 9.00-14.00

 

MMTS023 Approaches and Methods in Systematic Musicology

by Department of Music, Art and Culture Studies

ECTS credits: 5

Instructor: Marc Thompson, PhD, Senior Lecturer in Music, Mind & Technology and Researcher at Finnish Centre for Interdisciplinary Music Research (and colleagues TBD)

Level: advanced Bachelors/Masters course

Target group: suitable for both Music majors and Psychology majors (however neither music training nor computer programming experience is not required)

After completing the course the student is able to:

• Describe main research areas and key findings in systematic musicology research (psychology, cognitive science, music therapy)

• Understand key issues that govern the cognitive processes involved in music perception and production

• Explain the main methodologies used to Music Therapy

Practical component: learn to analyse music-related data using MIDI Toolbox and MIRToolbox and MATLAB, and visit to music therapy clinic and motion capture lab

Timing: 21 – 25 May

 

YRIA215 Intrapreneurship: Current Perspectives on New Business Development and Corporate Entrepreneurship

by Jyväskylä University School of Business and Economics

ECTS credits: 5

Lecturer: Dos. Ph.D. Juha Kansikas (Senior lecturer, JSBE, JYU)

Subject/field: Entrepreneurship / Business studies

Course description: The course focuses on classifying and analyzing entrepreneurial behavior and new business development. Analysing feasibility of new business ideas will be covered. The students are able to plan and to evaluate rewarding mechanisms which promote entrepreneurial behavior. Organising and leading entrepreneurial teams will be exercised.

Completion mode: Completion of a pre-course task, Learning portfolio, reflective exercise, and final case study.

Timing: 21 – 25 May

Class hours:

Mon - Thu 8:15 - 12:00

Fri 8:15 - 16:00

 

Finnish Language and Culture

by Language Centre

ECTS credits: 2

Lecturer: Minna Sorri, MA, Language Centre, University of Jyväskylä

Target group:
 All those interested in Finnish language and culture. No prior knowledge of Finnish required.

Course description: This basic Finnish course focuses on receptive skills, which means understanding simple everyday written and spoken phrases such as signs, newspaper advertisements and announcements. The students will learn simple phrases and greetings so that they can survive in everyday situations and places such as shops, cafes and restaurants. During the classes, we will also study language learning skills and strategies for understanding basic vocabulary and simple written phrases. While studying the language, the students will also learn about the history and specialties of the Finnish language as well as some basic features of Finnish culture. Some cultural visits will be arranged during the course. The students will have a chance to affect the contents of the course.

Mode of study: Daily classes and individual home work

Assessment: Written exam at the end of the course. The course is graded numerically on the scale of 1-5

Timing: 28 May – 1 June

Class hours: Mon - Fri 9.15 - 14.00

 

CIHD012 Working Models in Domestic Violence Counseling

by Department of Psychology

ECTS credits: 3

Lecturers: Juha Holma, Professor, University of Jyväskylä

Marianne Notko, Postdoctoral researcher, PhD, University of Jyväskylä

Marita Husso, University lecturer, PhD, University of Jyväskylä

Helena Päivinen, University teacher, PhD, University of Jyväskylä

Aarno Laitila, University lecturer, PhD, University of Jyväskylä

Target group: Students of psychology, social sciences, social work and others interested in the topic.

Course description: There is a growing awareness among professionals in different fields of human services of the scope and seriousness of violence within close domestic relationships. In most instances these situations include male perpetrators, female victims, and child or adolescent witnesses - although other patterns are also seen. The need to address these problems professionally within a comprehensive framework has been recognized. Intervention and treatment programmes for perpetrators, victims, and witnesses alike both on an individual and group basis are needed, backed up by public information campaigns. Joint family work is possible in some instances. This course will present the theoretical background of different approaches and give students insight into the particularities of various working models.

Mode of study: Lecture, group work, demonstrations, seminar

Assessment: Active participation, group work and written assignment

Timing: 28 May -1 June

 

National Education Systems: Foundations, frameworks, structures and experiences

by Faculty of Education and Psychology 

ECTS credits: 2-3

Field / subject: Education

Lecturers: Ms. Patricia Sveth, Youngstown State University and Mr. Pasi Ikonen, Faculty of Education and Psychology, University of Jyväskylä

Target group: This course is ideal for Bachelor- level students majoring in Education, Pedagogy, Teacher Education, Special Education or Educational Leadership

Learning Outcomes: After completing the course students are able to recognize connections between national education systems, individual experiences, educational philosophies and cultural/sociological phenomena.

Course description / Content:

National educational systems are complex and dynamic entities, with many interdependent elements: legal frameworks, governance structures, and pedagogical foundations. Study of these contrasting elements will provide a high-level introduction to the concept of a national educational system and enable students to situate their knowledge and experience of their own national system in an international context.

Mode of study: Contact hours 20 - 24 including lectures and collaborative group work, a reflective educational biography based on participants experiences and selected educational trends, a written assignment to be completed after the course.

Preliminary readings: Videos of Finnish education system (available on-line), others to be determined

Course literature: to be determined

Assessment: Active participation in the lectures and group work. Writing and presenting a reflective education biography. Formative self-assessment and summative peer feedback as a part of group work

Grading: 0-5

Timing: 28 May -1 June

 

Popular Culture and Identity Construction in the US and Finland

by Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences

ECTS credits: 4

Field / subject: Cultural Studies/Counseling & Psychology/Communication

Lecturers: Aino-Kaisa Koistinen, Ph.D., Department of Music, Art and Culture Studies, University of Jyväskylä; Gerald Monk, Ph.D., Department of Counseling and School Psychology, San Diego State University; Stacey Sinclair, Ph.D., Weber Honors College, San Diego State University; Elina Westinen, Ph.D., Department of Language and Communication Studies, University of Jyväskylä

Target group: This course is ideal for Bachelor- level students interested in the social construction of identity and popular culture. No prior knowledge of Counseling and Psychology is required.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

1. Increase their understanding of how popular culture is socially constructed.

2. Develop a heightened awareness of the role of popular culture in constructing identities and shaping the lives of individuals within the US and Finland.

3. Develop competency and skill in discourse analysis to analyze popular cultural activities and identity construction within the US and Finland.

4. Acquire greater understanding of the intersection of gender, race, ethnicity, and other dimensions of identity and how they shape the mainstream cultural landscape and present day society within the US and Finland.

5. Explore their personal attitudes and beliefs about popular culture and be more knowledgeable of the impact of popular culture on their own and other’s lives.

6. Increase their sensitivity to men and women’s lived experiences, personal functioning and well-being within US and Finnish society.

Course description / Content: This course will help students scrutinize popular culture from a social constructionist perspective, and examine the ways popular culture affects both Americans’ and Finns’ lives on micro- and macro-levels. In addition, discourse analysis will be applied to specific forms of popular culture, including social media, TV shows, movies, print advertising, commercials, music, and literature/fiction to identify mechanisms for raising consciousness and influencing behavior within psychological, social, political, and environmental spheres. The coursework will combine theory and background readings with experiential learning. Topics include:

• Understanding social constructionism as a theoretical and practice framework of analyzing identity construction

• Analyzing discourses within Popular Culture

•Negotiation/representation of (ethnic) otherness in Finnish hip hop

 •How rap artists with a migrant background construct ‘new’ ethnicities and (non)belonging in online and offline contexts

• How Nordic crime fiction (or Nordic Noir) television uses affective representations of violence in order to engage in discussions concerning migration, social inequality, and climate change

Mode of study: Lectures, group discussions, a learning journal, and a written assignment to be completed after the course. This course relies heavily on experiential learning and students are expected to contribute to the lectures actively through discussions.

Assessment: The course is evaluated with a grading scale from 0 to 5 (0=fail, 1=poor, 2=satisfactory, 3=good, 4=very good, 5=excellent). The criteria will be discussed in more detail during the first lecture.

Grading: 0-5

Timing: 28 May -1 June

Class hours:

Monday 9.00-15.00

Tuesday 9.00-15.00

Wednesday 12.00-15.00

Thursday 9.00-15.00

Friday 9.00-12.00

 

 

TERA204 Physical activity, Sport, Health and Health Promotion - International perspectives

by the Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences

ECTS credits: 4

Lecturers: Sami Kokko, Senior Researcher

Other lecturers to be announced

Target group: All interested

Content: The course will review of Finnish and European physical activity and sport cultures and introduce basics of health promotion. Also, a links between physical activity/sport and health promotion are illustrated. Two wider studies, namely International Health Behavior in School-aged Children study (HBSC) – a WHO collaborative cross-national study and The national Health Promoting Sports Club study, are presented.

Outcomes: On successful completion of this course, student is able to:

• understand social sciences perspective on physical activity and health promotion

• demonstrate a link between physical activity and sport to health

• interpret overall situation of health behavior and apply (to a given country) the results of the international HBSC study

• understand the concept of settings-based health promotion and apply it to a sports club setting

Timing: 28 May -1 June

Class hours: Mon - Thu: 9.15 - 15.45, Fri 9.00 -12.00.

 

CIHD031 Introduction to Dance Movement Therapy and Other Arts Therapies

by Department of Psychology

ECTS credits: 3

Lecturers:

Katriina Hyvönen, PhD, Psychologist, Psychotherapist, Dance Movement Therapist

Päivi Pylvänäinen, MA, Psychologist, Dance Movement Therapist

Aims and content: Dance Movement Therapy, as well as other Arts Therapies, has similar theoretical underpinnings as verbal psychotherapies. Creativity, however, is emphasized and surfaces in the centre of the therapeutic process. Proceeding from this, the aim of this course is twofold. First, experiential learning is emphasized and will provide an opportunity to explore and reflect on own experiences of the movement process. Second, the course includes a theoretical component that provides a brief overview of Dance Movement Therapy within the context of other Arts Therapies (i.e., Art Therapy, Music Therapy, Drama Therapy). Students can make connections between theory and their own movement experiences through the interactions with others, reading of arts therapies literature and writing movement diaries. The course is suited to students interested in exploring their own experiences through body awareness and creative movement. The number of places on the course is limited to 25 and students with prior knowledge of psychology and related fields are given priority. However, no previous dance experience is required and the course does not include physically demanding activities.

Mode of study: Movement workshops, pair/group work, and lectures

Assessment: Participation and movement diary which is graded on a scale from 1 to 5.

Course materials:

Karkou, V., & Sanderson, P. (2006). Arts therapies: A research-based map of the field. Churchill Livingstone.

Meekums, B. (2005). Dance Movement Therapy: A Creative Psychotherapeutic Approach. London: Sage Publications.

Payne, H. (1992/2006). Dance movement therapy: Theory and practice. London & New York: Routledge.

Punkanen, M. & Saarikallio, S. (2014). Emotions in motion: short-term group form Dance/Movement Therapy in the treatment of depression: a pilot study. The Arts in Psychotherapy, 41, 493–497.

Pylvänäinen, P. & Lappalainen, R. (2017). Change in body image among depressed adult outpatients after a dance movement therapy group treatment. Arts in Psychotherapy, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aip.2017.10.006.

Pylvänäinen, P., Muotka, J. & Lappalainen, R. (2015). A dance movement therapy group for depressed adult patients in psychiatric outpatient clinic: effects of the treatment. Frontiers in Clinical Psychology, 6:980, https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2015.00980

Ylönen, M. & Cantell, M. (2009). Kinaesthetic narratives: Interpretations for children’s dance movement therapy process. Body, Movement and Dance in Psychotherapy, 4, 215–230.

Timing: 28 May -1 June

 

 

Visual Research Methods

by Department of Social Sciences and Philosophy

ECTS credits: 3-4

Lecturers:

• Rasa Žakevičiūtė, Department of Social Sciences and Philosophy

• Joanna Kędra, PhD

Target group: All students, who want to know about or intend to use visual research methods. No prior knowledge of visual research methods is required.

Mode of study: The course will consist of daily lectures introducing visual research methods, group work and exercises during class and personal homework assignments (for 3 ECTS) and optional learning diary (for 4 ECTS).

Content: Like never before, our life and daily communication has considerably changed towards more visually oriented one. Thus, any attempt at describing and analyzing, and foremost, at understanding contemporary society should incorporate visuals. This course provides students with an introduction to visual research methods, including participatory visual methods, researcher-generated data and methods of analysis of found images. We will work with photographs, advertisements, drawings, data visualisations and many more. In addition, issues related to research ethics while working with visual material will be discussed. The course will be built on learning by doing, and thus, students will practice their research skills both in collecting or generating visual material and in analysing it with their peers. Foremost, we will try to feel the joy of seeing and discovering meanings in visual research.

Learning outcomes:

On completion of the course students will:

• gain basic knowledge about visual research methods,

• understand differences between various visual research methods used across disciplines,

• be able to choose visual method(s) suitable for their own research topics,

• know how to conduct research using visual research methods,

• understand ethical issues in visual research,

• learn to use visual thinking when approaching visual material,

• develop their competency in visual literacy.

Assessment: Active participation, learning diary. The course is evaluated with a grading scale from 1 to 5 (0=fail, 5=excellent).

Timing: 4 - 8 June

Class Hours:

Monday: 9.15-11.30 and 12.30-14.00 (lunch break: 11.30-12.30)

Tuesday: 9.15-11.30 and 12.30-14.00

Wednesday: 9.15-11.30 and 12.30-14.00

Thursday: 9.15-11.30 and 12.30-14.00

Friday: 10.00-11.30 and 12.30-14.00

 

OJU02200 Learning environments enhancing student interaction: global trends and best practices

by Department of Teacher Education

ECTS credits: 2 (3 ECTS negotiable with extra assignment)

Field / subject: Education, Linguistics

Lecturer: Tamás Péter Szabó, University Teacher, Department of Teacher Education

Target group: This course is ideal for students in educational science, educational leadership, special education, language education, psychology, or other fields related to learning and teaching.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this course, student is able to

• critically study and interpret physical learning environments;

• construct and express their view on the impact of physical learning environments on interaction;

• build strategies for the conscious design and development of physical learning environments in their own teaching practice

Course description / Content:

The course helps the students to build strategies for the conscious design and development of physical learning environments (that is, schoolscapes). The course raises awareness to the role schoolscapes play in institutional interaction of various kinds (classroom interaction, organizational cultures of communication, and narrated local/national/global history).

The course invites students to build a spatial and social understanding of learning. Such an understanding helps the students to develop teaching practices that involve their students intensively into interaction, exploratory learning and customizing learning environments. The course is based on research in Central Europe and Finland, and the U.S. Best practices are discussed with students in detail.

Topics of the course include the following (one topic per day):

1. Understanding organizational cultures through schoolscape: how to “read” the schoolscape? What does it “tell” to us about the organizational culture, the languages, the various cultural groups in the school?

2. Basic methods in schoolscape research

3. How interaction takes place in various schoolscape settings? Communication and interaction in and out of the school (cf. ‘learning in the wild’). Schoolscapes enhancing mono-/bi-/multilingual communication.

4. Community planning and negotiation/contestation of schoolscapes.

5. Towards innovation: building schoolscape-aware pedagogies.

Mode of study: lectures 20 hours (4 hours per day), including extensive group discussions and hands-on analysis of examples that come from original research. A written assignment to be completed after the course.

Preliminary readings:

1. Intro to the study field: Gorter, D. 2017 [in press]. Linguistic landscapes and trends in the study of schoolscapes. Linguistics and Education http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.linged.2017.10.001

2. Intro to methods: Szabó, T. P. 2015. The Management of Diversity in Schoolscapes: an analysis of Hungarian practices. Apples – Journal of Applied Language Studies 9(1), pp. 23–51. http://apples.jyu.fi/article/abstract/353

Course literature includes:

1. Selected papers from the special issue Studying the visual and material dimensions of education and learning, ed. P. Laihonen & T. P. Szabó, Linguistics and Education 2017. [to appear late 2017, including 7 original research papers from various educational and geographical contexts]

2. Selected research papers such as Aronin, L. & M. Ó Laoire 2013. The material culture of multilingualism: moving beyond the linguistic landscape. International Journal of Multilingualism, 10:3, 225–235, DOI: 10.1080/14790718.2012.679734

Assessment: Active participation in the course meetings and writing a learning log on topics related to the course.

Grading: 0–5

Timing: 4 - 8 June

 

LYTA509 Sport Marketing

by the Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences

ECTS credits: 2 or 4

Lecturers:

Dr. Hanna Vehmas, University of Jyväskylä (coordinator)

MSc Anna Lee Melin, University of Jyväskylä

Target group:

Primarily students of sport management/sport sciences/marketing

Learning Outcomes:

 On successful completion of this course, student is able to:

• demonstrate an understanding of the elements behind the concepts and models of sport event management, marketing, branding, consumer behaviour, sport technology, and sport related tourism

Content: The course will introduce students to the concepts and theory of sport marketing, sport management and marketing communications. Under the expert guidance of international lecturers, the fundamental reasoning of these topics will be discussed and applied to specific practical cases

Modes of Study: Lectures and seminars 24 hours, practical exercises and group work presentations and writing assignments learning log.

Additional Literature: To be announced during the lectures.

Modes of Completion:

 1) For 2 ECTS credits: Active participation in lectures, group work and completing the lecture diary.

2) For 4 ECTS credits: Above mentioned + written paper of 10-12 pages.

Grading: 0-5

1) For 2 ECTS credits: Active participation in lectures 15 %, group work 25 % and lecture diary 60 %.

2) For 4 ECTS credits:  Active participation in lectures 15 %, group work 25 % and lecture diary 20 %. + written paper of 10-12 pages 40 %.

Timing: 4 - 8 June

Location: Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences

 

 

MCPS131 Cultural Economy and Work

by the Department of Social Sciences and Philosophy

ECTS credits: 5

Lecturers: Mikko Jakonen (Senior Lecturer, Cultural Policy), Miikka Pyykkönen (Professor, Cultural Policy)

Subject/field: Cultural Policy and Cultural Economy

Course description: The course provides an overview of cultural economics linked with the cultural sector, cultural industries and cultural policy. The course deals with topics such as the market demand for arts and culture, the status of artists, art and culture as work, creative economy, cultural entrepreneurship, commons, precarization, the determinants of participation in arts and culture, welfare economics, market failures such as externalities and public goods in the cultural sector, the non-market demand for arts and culture, cost-benefit analysis, production, productivity and the earning gap, the value of fine art and the economics of intellectual property.

Number of contact hours: 24

Assessment: Group work and essay

Timing: 4 - 8 June

Class hours: Monday and Tuesday 9-15, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday 10-14

 

JOUA111 Press photography: theory, practice and interpretation

by Department of Language and Communication Studies

ECTS credits: 3

Lecturer: Joanna Kędra, PhD

Target group: The course is dedicated to students of all disciplines interested in photography, photojournalism and visual interpretation. Prior knowledge of photography or photographic skills and experience are not required, but high motivation for creative work and active participation in the discussions and assignments are more than welcome. Please bring along own digital camera, simple or more advanced; camera phones are acceptable.

Mode of study: lectures, workshops, group discussions, peer-feedback, photographic assignments (one pre-course and two in-course), learning portfolio

Content: The course explores history, theory and practice of photography, especially in regard to photographs in the press and profession of photojournalist. Students will explore portfolios and biographies of famous photographers and war correspondents, discuss ethics in photojournalistic work, learn to interpret photographs and identify journalistic photo genres.

Additionally, students will work on three (one pre-course and two in-course) creative photographic assignments for their learning portfolio. Photographs will be shared and used in the classroom activities. During the course, students will improve their photographic skills as well as critical thinking about images along with methods of their interpretation.

Please note that this course combines both theory and history of photography with photographic practice. As such, it does not solely focus on advancing one’s photographic skills. The course is foremost about photographs in the press, and thus, the course content, activities and photographic assignments will be designed along this line.

Aims: The course aims to facilitate students’ individual development in visual literacy in multicultural study group. It will combine both theory and practice of photography through dialogic lectures and workshops.

Learning outcomes:

On successful completion of this course, student is able to:

▪ recall basic facts from the history of photography,

▪ identify key photographers, their work and style,

▪ evaluate own photographic work and the work of others,

▪ apply interdisciplinary knowledge into (press) photography interpretation,

▪ implement theory on photography interpretation into own critical judgment of photographs in everyday visual communication,

And: will advance his/her skills in visual literacy (i.e. visual reading, writing and thinking in terms of images).

Assessment: Active participation, photographic assignments (including pre-course assignment, for which instructions will be sent to registered students) and learning portfolio, which is a combination of learning diary and student’s photographic assignments (instructions will be provided during the first class). The course is evaluated with a grading scale from 1 to 5 (0=fail, 5=excellent).

Timing: 11 – 15 June

Class Hours:

Monday: 9.15-11.30 and 12.30-14.00 (lunch break: 11.30-12.30)

Tuesday: 9.15-11.30 and 12.30-14.00

Wednesday: 9.15-11.30 and 12.30-14.00

Thursday: 9.15-11.30 and 12.30-14.00

Friday: 10.00-11.30 and 12.30-14.00

 

Sports Economics

by Jyväskylä University School of Business and Economics

Subject/field: Economics

ECTS credits: 2

Lecturers: Dr. Esa Mangeloja, University of Jyväskylä and Dr. Tomi Ovaska & Dr. Albert Sumell, Youngstown State University (Ohio, USA)

Target group: The course should fit the interests of both the beginning and advanced learners of sports economics.

Learning outcomes:

By the end of the course, students should be able to adequately:

- apply basic microeconomic principles, such as supply and demand, competition, opportunity   costs, monopoly power, rate of return, etc., to explain and analyze the business of sports.

- explain the choices of sports organizations, owners, players, and fans.

- explain the primary determinants of compensation and prize money to players and teams in major professional sports.

- explain the economic impact and returns to investment of public dollars in the development of new stadiums and sports arenas.

- have a better understanding of the role of sports in society.

Course description / Content: Sports have an enormous global footprint, with billions of practitioners. In addition to recreational participants, there are also tens of millions professional athletes. Sports equipment manufacturers sell billions of dollars worth of gear to the public on the backs of sports idols, and companies pay hefty fees to have their logos prominently displayed in international telecasts. The players on teams and individual winners of major events can become international celebrities, with potentially millions fans all over the world. In a supremely competitive environment, top athletes can earn tens of millions of dollars a year in prize and promotional money. Modern sports venues have also become mass entertainment centers, often subsidized from local tax revenue. In all, even if one wanted to, it is hard, if not impossible, not to be cognizant of some sports events in one’s locality. Sports are simply part of people’s daily lives all over the world, with many associated socio-economic issues. This course in Sports Economics is a wide-ranging introduction to the subject. During the course standard economic tools are developed to analyze major aspects of professional and college sports. Prerequisite: One year of university studies, no previous course work in economics is assumed.

Lecture Content:

While there is no required book, a recommended book is Rodney Fort’s “Sports Economics” 3rd edition, on which the majority of lectures are based.

Section 1.  Warm Up:  The Business of Sports

Section 2.  Demand and Sports Revenue

Section 3.  The Market for Sports Broadcast Rights

Section 4.  Team Cost, Profit, and Winning

Section 5.  Sports Market Outcomes I

Section 6.  Sports Market Outcomes II

Section 7.  The Value of Sports Talent

Section 8.  The History of Player Pay

Section 9.  Labor Relations in Pro Sports

Section 10. Subsidies and Economic Impact Analysis

Section 11. The Stadium Mess

Section 12. Taxes, Antitrust and Competition Policy

Section 13. College Sports

Mode of study: 25 hours of lectures, group discussions and exercises.

Course literature: An optional reading: Rodney Fort: “Sports Economics,” 3rd edition. Prentice Hall: London, UK.

Assessment: Active participation in the lectures, a final exam.

Grading: 0-5

Timing: 11 – 15 June  

 

KVVA103 Introduction to Intercultural Communication

by Department of Language and Communication Studies

ECTS credits: 5

Lecturers: Maria Sharapan, doctoral student, Department of Language and Communication Studies, University of Jyväskylä and Marko Siitonen, PhD and senior lecturer, Department of Language and Communication Studies, University of Jyväskylä

Target group: Communication students, minors in communication, exchange students at the university, and students who have an interest in communication and/or culture

The aim: to introduce the fundamental principles and issues of intercultural communication from an interdisciplinary perspective as well as to develop perception and appreciation of different cultural perspectives and values.

Learning outcomes: On completion of this course the student will be able to

• critically discuss the fundamental principles and topics in intercultural communication from an interdisciplinary perspective

• perceive different cultural perspectives and values and appreciate cultural diversity

• analyse communication between people from different racial, ethnic and cultural backgrounds in both national and international settings.

Mode of study: lecture

Assessment: Active participation in the lectures and final examination

Timing: 11 – 15 June  

 

Learning and teaching in growing diversity

by Faculty of Education

ECTS credits: 3

Lecturer: Katarzyna Kärkkäinen, Researcher, Teacher Education Department and FIER, University of Jyväskylä

Target group: The course is suitable to all students interested in issues of approaching diversity and diverse students in various learning settings (educational institutions, workplaces). Pre-knowledge on matters related to diversity in education and in society is of value; however, it is not required. Students of all subjects and of various backgrounds are welcome.

Working methods: Lectures, active discussion during lectures, group discussions and group work, reading and assignments to be completed outside course hours, learning diary

Content: The course deals with aspects related to growing diversity in education and society. The course focuses especially on learning and teaching in various learning settings (educational institutions, workplace learning sites) characterized by increased linguistic and cultural diversity. All above students will work to improve their understanding of the context in which individuals with migration background live and learn. The course offers an opportunity to critical reflection on matters related to culture, language and personal differences in learning and teaching. The course covers following topics:

- social context of learning (e.g., migrants position in new country of residence)

- particularities of learning and living in a new context

- different starting points for learning and teaching

- language and culture vs. personal differences in learning and teaching

- modes of working and ways of supporting migrant learners

- multicultural curriculum development

- possibilities, tensions and limitations connected to migrants’ participation in formal education

Aims: On successful completion of this course, students are able to:

- understand the specifics of learning and living in a new linguistic and cultural context

- recognize the founds of knowledge of students with various backgrounds

- critically reflect on language and culture aspects in education and in society

- be aware of their own starting points and biases in approaching linguistic and cultural differences in different learning sites

- analyze and reflect on their own practices and behaviors in multicultural and multilingual learning sites 

- be aware of and be able to use potential pedagogies for growing diversity in various learning settings

- understand the challenges and possibilities that participation in education presents to getting forward in a new country of residence

Assessment: The course is evaluated with a grading scale from 1 to 5 (0=fail, 1=satisfactory, 3=good, 4= very good, 5 = excellent). The criteria will be discussed in more detail during the first lecture. The criteria will be discussed in more detail during the first class.

Timing: 11 – 15 June  

Class hours:

Monday at 9.00 - 15.00

Tuesday at 9.00 - 15.00

Wednesday at 12.00 – 15.30

Thursday at 9.00-12:30

Friday at 9.00 - 12.30

 

SPTP101 Introduction to Gender Studies

by Department of of Social Sciences and Philosophy

ECTS credits: 2-3

Active participation in lectures and discussions, presentation based on course materials sent in advance (70%), writing a personal learning log/diary (30%), equal 2 ECTS.

Lecturer: Eira Juntti, PhD Adjunct Instructor

Target group: Bachelor’s level students in social sciences and humanities, but also more advanced students who have no background in gender studies.

Course description: The course offers an overview of gender studies as a field within social sciences. The most common theoretical approaches to gender as well as current research topics (e.g. parenthood and changing family structures, gender in the labor market, gender & sports, forms of feminist activism) will be discussed.

Mode of study: Lectures, discussions, class presentations, learning log/diary.  24h.

Assessment: Active participation in lectures and discussions (70%), writing a personal learning log/diary (30%), equal 2 ECTS. The course is graded on the scale of 1-5.

Timing: 11-15 June

Class hours: Mon-Thr 10:00-12:00 and 12:30-15:30. Friday 10:00-12:00 and 12:30-14:30