Courses

Summer School Courses 2019

IMPORTANT!

Because each course lasts for one week, it is possible to participate in one course per week only.

NB! The University of Jyväskylä reserves the right to make changes to the course programme.

Please click here to see the Summer School Course Schedule 2019

Finnish Language and Culture
Education in Finland
Introduction to Intercultural Communication
Intrapreneurship: Current Perspectives on New Business Development and Corporate Entrepreneurship
Physical Activity, Sport, Health and Health Promotion - International Perspectives

Refugee Resettlement and Integration
Organization and Role of Sport in the EU and its Member States
Humor, Laughter, and Society
Greek Political Thought and its Modern Echos
Nordic Working Life Model: Past, Present and the Future of Work in Light of Institutional Theories

Changes of Work and Economy
Managing Customer Relationships with Digital Marketing
Teaching for Quality Learning in Diverse Learning Settings
Music, Mind & Well-being
Magic of the Game - Perspectives to Digital Games

Multilingual Communication in Multicultural Teams
National Education Systems: Foundations, Frameworks, Structures and Experiences
Visual Research Methods
Introduction to Dance Movement Therapy and Other Arts TherapiesSport Marketing
Ear Training - Blended Learning

XSUX1000 Finnish Language and Culture

by Language Centre

ECTS credits: 2

Lecturers: Minna Sorri (FM) and Anniina Tourunen, Language Centre, University of Jyväskylä

Target group: All those interested in Finnish language and culture. No prior knowledge of Finnish required.

Course description: This basic Finnish course focuses on receptive skills, which means understanding simple everyday written and spoken phrases such as signs, newspaper advertisements and announcements. The students will learn simple phrases and greetings so that they can survive in everyday situations and places such as shops, cafes and restaurants. During the classes, we will also study language learning skills and strategies for understanding basic vocabulary and simple written phrases. While studying the language, the students will also learn about the history and specialties of the Finnish language as well as some basic features of Finnish culture. Some cultural visits will be arranged during the course. The students will have a chance to affect the contents of the course.

Mode of study: Daily classes and individual home work

Assessment: Written exam at the end of the course. The course is graded numerically on the scale of 1-5

Timing: Week I: 20 - 24 May 2019 (2 groups)

Class hours: Mon - Fri 9.15 - 14.00

Location:

INFO: Mon 9.15 AgC234

Group 1 
Mon: 9.15 - 14.00 AgC234
Tue: 9.15 -14.00 AgD211
Wed: 9.15 - 14.00 AgC232
Thu: 9.15 -14.00 AgD211
Fri: 9.15 - 14.00 AgC234

Group 2
Mon: 9.15 - 14.00 AgC231
Tue: 9.15 -14.00 AgC231
Wed: 9.15 - 14.00 AgC231
Thu: 9.15 -14.00 AgC233
Fri: 9.15 - 14.00 AgD211

MCE0210 Education in Finland

by Faculty of Education and Psychology

ECTS credits: 3

Lecturers: Pasi Ikonen, Faculty of Education and Psychology, University of Jyväskylä

Target group: Visiting Bachelor and Master level students interested in Finnish education

Outcomes: Upon completion of the course, the students are able to understand the Finnish system of education, and they can describe different aspects of the Finnish education system.

Mode of study: Lectures about Finnish education system (e.g. early childhood education, basic education, special education, adult education, teacher education).  Written assignment.

Literature: Curricula 2014 (ECEC, Pre-primary and primary education, and upper secondary)

Assessment: 0-5

Timing: Week I: 20 - 24 May 2019

Class hours and locations: 

Mon:                 

9:00 - 12:00      RUU E 214

13:00 - 14:30   RUU E 213

Tue:                   

9:00 – 12:00     Visit to the on-campus primary and lower secondary schools (Normaalikoulu)

13:00 - 15:00   S203

Wed:                 

8.45 – 11.00    Visit to a day care centre, Meeting at Ruusupuisto 8.45 am                           

12.30 – 14.30   L310                  

Thu:                   

9.00 – 15.00   S204                    

Fri:                                                  

09:15-12:30   S204

KVVA103 Introduction to Intercultural Communication

by Department of Language and Communication Studies

ECTS credits: 5

Lecturers: Malgorzata Lahti and Margarethe Olbertz-Siitonen, Department of Language and Communication Studies, University of Jyväskylä

Subject/field: Intercultural Communication

Target group: Communication students, minors in communication, exchange students at the university, and students who have an interest in communication and/or views on culture

Content: The aim of this course is to introduce the fundamental principles and issues of intercultural communication from an interdisciplinary perspective as well as to develop perception and appreciation of different cultural perspectives and values.

Learning outcomes: On completion of this course the student will be able to

identify major research directions in intercultural communication

critically discuss the fundamental principles and topics in intercultural communication from an interdisciplinary perspective

• perceive different cultural perspectives and values and appreciate cultural diversity

• analyse communication between people from different racial, ethnic and cultural backgrounds in both national and international settings

Mode of study: Lectures, written assignment(s)

Assessment: Active participation in the lectures, group work and final assignment

Timing: Week I: 20 - 24 May 2019

Class Hours: Mon – Fri 9.15 – 14.15 

Location: 

Mon – Tue: H306

Wed: Boombox

Thu – Fri: F106

Lecture rooms booked until 15.45 from Mon to Fri and can be used for working on a group assignment after the teaching hours

YRIA215 Intrapreneurship: Current Perspectives on New Business Development and Corporate Entrepreneurship

by Jyväskylä University School of Business and Economics

ECTS credits: 5

Lecturer: Dos. Ph.D. Juha Kansikas (Senior lecturer, Jyväskylä School of Business and Economics, University of Jyväskylä)

Subject/field: Entrepreneurship / Business studies

Course description: The course focuses on classifying and analyzing entrepreneurial behavior and new business development. Analysing feasibility of new business ideas will be covered. The students are able to plan and to evaluate rewarding mechanisms which promote entrepreneurial behavior. Organising and leading entrepreneurial teams will be exercised.

Completion mode: Completion of a pre-course task, learning portfolio, reflective exercise, and final case study.

Timing: Week I: 20 - 24 May 2019

Class hours: Mon - Thu 10 - 14, Fri 10 - 16

Location: AgC 232 (Agora - Building)

TERA204 Physical activity, Sport, Health and Health Promotion - International perspectives

by the Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences

ECTS credits: 4

Lecturers: Sami Kokko, PhD (Senior Researcher, Adjunct Professor), Hanna Vehmas (PhD, University Lecturer)

Target group: All interested

Content: The course will review of Finnish and European physical activity and sport cultures and introduce basics of health promotion. Also, a links between physical activity/sport and health promotion are illustrated. Two wider studies, namely International Health Behavior in School-aged Children study (HBSC) – a WHO collaborative cross-national study and The national Health Promoting Sports Club study, are presented.

Outcomes: On successful completion of this course, student is able to:

  • understand social sciences perspective on physical activity and health promotion
  • demonstrate a link between physical activity and sport to health
  • interpret overall situation of health behavior and apply (to a given country) the results of the international HBSC study
  • understand the concept of settings-based health promotion and apply it to a sports club setting


Mode of study:
Lectures 18 hours, independent work 6 hours and seminars 3 hours and seminar presentation (group assignment) and a written assignment to be completed after the course (independent learning log)

Assessment: Active participation in the lectures and seminar, seminar presentation (50%) and writing an independent learning log on topics related to the course (50%).

Grading: 0-5

Timing: Week I: 20 - 24 May 2019

Class hours: Mon - Thu: 9 -16, Fri: 9 - 12

Location: L206A

XYHX010 Refugee Resettlement and Integration

by Language Centre

ECTS credits: 2-3

Lecturers: Lotta Kokkonen, PhD, Language Centre, University of Jyväskylä, Kristen Hill Maher, PhD, Associate Professor of Political Science, San Diego State University

Learning Outcomes: After successfully completing this course students should be able to:
1.    understand refugees’ life situations from varied perspectives
2.    analyze structural, social, and everyday factors shaping  refugees’ adaptation to their new environments
3.    participate and engage within multicultural groups

Content: The number of refugees looking for places to settle has grown during the last century due to natural disasters, conflicts and war. It looks like the number of people being displaced is not about to drop in the near future. This course offers students insight into the reasons behind the refugee flows, and a range of challenges and possibilities created by refugee flows at a local and everyday level.

Topics:
1.    Introduction to refugee politics and law
2.    Finnish policy and practices regarding refugee admission and integration
3.    How refugees’ background and experiences affect their adaptation to a new environment
4.    Interpersonal relationships within integration process (developing new relationships, dealing with losses, transnational networks)
5.    Trust and social support among refugees and officials
6.    Conflicts over belonging and national identities /

As part of the process, we will examine questions of where integration happens and how can we understand the range of responses among Finns.

Mode of study: The pedagogical foundation relies heavily on experiential learning (e.g. Kolb) and active learning (e.g. Bonwell & Eison; Revans). Learning methods include lectures, readings (to be specified later) discussions and exercises during the classes. Further, field visits, individual / group assignments are to be completed during the course, partly outside the lecture hours. Students are encouraged to contribute to the lectures actively through discussions. For 3 ECTS credits, students should complete an additional written learning assignment.

Grading: The course is evaluated with a grading scale from 1 to 5 (0=fail, 1=satisfactory, 3=good, 4= very good, 5 = excellent). The criteria will be discussed in more detail during the first lecture.

Timing: Week II: 27 May - 31 May 2019

Class hours and locations: 

Mon    09:00-11:45      RUU C 101 Lucina                                                                                

Mon   12:45-15:00      Ag C234                                                                      

Tue    09:00-12:00      RUU C 101 Lucina                                                                                

Tue    12:15-15:00      RUU C 101 Lucina                                                                                

Wed   09:00-12:00      RUU C 101 Lucina

Wed  12:00-15:00      S 303

Fri     09:00-12:00      RUU C 101 Lucina

 

Organization and Role of Sport in the EU and its Member States

by Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences

ECTS credits: Either 2 or 4. Students will write a learning log that incorporates the relevant issues discussed in the class: 5-6 pages for 2 ECTS credits or 10-12 pages for 4 ECTS credits.

Lecturers:

  • Anna-Katriina Salmikangas, PhD, Senior Researcher, Department of the Sport Sciences, University of Jyväskylä
  • Other lecturers to be announced later


Target group:
This course is ideal for Bachelor level students of e.g. sport management, organizational studies, leadership and European studies.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this course, student is able to:

  • identify various EU organizations from a sport perspective and understand the role of sport in the EU
  • recognize the role of sport at international, national and local level
  • apply the knowledge about the different ways of organizing sport in different countries in the settings of his/her home country
  • create a project plan for applying funding for promoting sports


Content:

  • EU structures, funding and development issues
  • Sport in the EU
  • Preparing a project plan for one of the EU calls for sports


Mode of study
: Lectures 24 hours, practical exercises, and a written assignment to be completed after the course. Learning will be facilitated through discussion, computer-based research, group works and presentations.

Assessment: Active participation in the lectures and writing a learning log on topics related to the course. Students will write a learning log that incorporates the relevant issues discussed in the class: 5-6 pages for 2 ECTS credits or 10-12 pages for 4 ECTS credits.

Grading: 0-5. (active participation 20%, group work 40% and learning log 40%)

Timing: Week II: 27 May - 31 May 2019

Class hours and locations: 

Mon - Tue    9.15 - 15.00    RUU E214 Onni
Wed    9.15-15.00    RUU E314 Isa
Fri    9.15-14.00    RUU E214 Onni

YFIM6002 Humor, Laughter, and Society

by Department of Social Sciences and Philosophy

Field / subject: Social Sciences, Philosophy, Humor Studies

ECTS credits: 5

Lecturers: Jarno Hietalahti, Department of Social Sciences and Philosophy, University of Jyväskylä

Target group: This course is planned for both Bachelor and Master level students majoring in Social Sciences and in Human Sciences (e.g. Political studies, Philosophy, Sociology, Cultural Policy).

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this course, student is able to understand and analyze humor and laughter from a scientific perspective. He or she understands the social significance of humor and how humor affects and molds personal lives. Student will be familiar with the classical theories of humor (including Superiority Theory, Relief Theory, Incongruity Theory) as well as on modern theories of humor (including The Benign Violation Theory of Humor, General Verbal Theory of Humor, and  Appropriate Incongruity Theory). He or she has a deeper understanding on the relationship between humor and society as well as how humor is related to, for instance, politics.

Content: What makes things funny? Why do we laugh? What do we laugh about? What is the social significance of humor? Everyone is an expert on humor because he or she knows what is funny to oneself. In this sense, humor is universal. However, there are vast cultural differences on what is perceived humorous. Humor in China is presumably different than in Finland, and Finnish humor differs from Canadian amusement. In addition, not every citizen of the same country shares a similar taste in humor. From this perspective, humor is highly individual feature. Solving this paradox of universality and individuality is in the core of this course.

Humor functions in different ways in different societies and historical periods. For instance, the relationship between humor and free speech varies from culture to another. This means that the social significance of humor is not same everywhere; humor can be seen as a tool for social change but it can also further oppression. During the course various kinds of humor scandals will be analyzed, and through examples we will examine how comedians and satirists take part in political processes.

Mode of study: Lectures 20 hours (including group discussions). A writing assignment to be completed after the course.

Preliminary readings: To be announced

Course literature: To be announced

Assessment: Active participation in the lectures and group discussions. Writing a learning log (1-2 page(s) per lecture) on topics related to the course.

Grading: 0-5

Timing: Week II: 27 May - 31 May 2019

Class hours:

Mon - Wed: 9.15 - 16.00
Thu: No lectures
Fri: 9.15 - 16.00

Location: S203

YFIM6003 Greek political thought and its modern echos

by Department of Social Sciences and Philosophy

Field / subject: History of political thought

ECTS credits: 2 or 4

Lecturers: Tuomas Parsio, Department of Social Sciences and Philosophy, University of Jyväskylä

Target group: This course is ideal for undergrad students majoring in Political Science or Philosophy, as well as more advanced students from other fields of the human sciences

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this course, the student is able to appreciate and evaluate the relevance of Greek political thought in the context of the high points of modern political history

Content: This course examines and assesses the continuing relevance of vocabulary and points of view on politics inherited from Greek philosophy. Through critical study of concepts such as democracy, tyranny – and indeed politics itself – we will try to gain historically informed perspectives on modern political history and contemporary politics. We will also study some of the 20th century thinkers who have advocated a “return” to ancient political thought.

Preliminary readings: at least one of the following: Aristotle: Politics, book 3 – Adorno and Horkheimer: Dialectic of Enlightenment, excursus 1 (“Odysseus, or Myth and Enlightenment”) – Leo Strauss, Natural Right and History, chapter 1 – Hannah Arendt, The Human Condition, chapter 5

Course literature: reading assignments TBA

Assessment: Active participation in the lectures (20 hours) and writing a learning log on topics related to the course (for 2 ECTS) and a short essay on a more specific topic (for 4 ECTS).

Grading: 0-5

Timing: Week II: 27 May - 31 May 2019

Class hours:

Mon - Wed 9.15 - 16

Fri: 9.15 - 16

Location: L206A

 

YFIM6004 Nordic working life model: past, present and the future of work in light of institutional theories

by Department of Social Sciences and Philosophy

Field / subject: social sciences, social and public policy, sociology of work

ECTS credits:  4 or 5

Lecturers: Armi Mustosmäki, Department of Social Sciences and Philosophy, University of Jyväskylä

Target group: Suitable both for intermediate and advanced level students

Content: This course explores the question on the existence and persistence of the Nordic working life model and the past, present and the future of work in light of institutional theories and comparative research methods. The course introduces the main features of the institutional framework of the Nordic work life model: how various labor market institutions such as labor legislation, trade unions, collective agreements and inclusive educational and training systems regulate employment relationships and affect work life outcomes, creating high quality of work life. What kind of change in work life is expected according to institutional theories? How has quality of work life in various countries changed in light of statistics and working conditions surveys? The course also discusses the question of occupational and gender in/equalities in the Nordic working life. How does the gender gap in work life look like from a comparative perspective: are women in Nordic countries more (dis)advantaged in terms of career achievements, supervisory and managerial positions, and quality of jobs? Furthermore, during the course we will critically discuss the durability of institutions as well as their meaning for future of work. There are several pressures for change that have been interpreted as challenges for the Nordic model, such as digitalization and new forms of work, managerial practices that may be interpreted as institutional avoidance, and rapidly emerging new service industries which traditional institutional anchors weakly protect. Is the Nordic model likely to sustain in the future? How will work (both the quantity and quality) change in the future?  The concluding lectures evaluate how these changes threaten the functioning of institutions as protecting mechanisms.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this course, student

  • has gained basic knowledge about Nordic working life model, its institutional features, and outcomes from the employee perspective
  • understands main differences between employment regimes in Europe, and acquires greater understanding on how employment and work life outcomes vary according to gender, occupation and sector in various regimes 
  • learns to use statistical and survey research material tools available online for searching information on change in work life and apply them
  • has developed his/her competencies in critically evaluating and participating in (public) discussions concerning change in work life.


Mode of study
: Lectures, group discussions, a written essay assignment to be completed after the course for 4 ECTS, + optional learning diary for 5 ECTS

Course literature: a list of articles will be circulated to be used as source material for the written assignment

Assessment: Active participation in the lectures/group discussions, writing an essay on one chosen topic related to the course outline, using the lectures and the additional reading material as sources (+optional learning diary, instructions given at the beginning of the course).

Grading: 0-5 (0=fail, 5=excellent)

Timing: Week II: 27 May - 31 May 2019

Class hours: Mon - Wed and Fri: 9.15 - 16.00 (no class on Thursday)

Location: L221

YFIM6005 Changes of Work and Economy

by Department of Social Sciences and Philosophy

Field / subject: Sociology, Economics, Political Science, Social Policy, Cultural Economy

ECTS credits: 5

Lecturer: Mikko Jakonen, Department of Social Sciences and Philosophy, University of Jyväskylä

Target group: This course suits good for students in all levels from social sciences, economics, humanities and educational studies.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this course, student is able to recognize different theories and conceptualization of work and economy throughout the history, and understand broad changes of work and economy especially in modern and contemporary times. Student knows how different approaches of work and economy influence to the everyday life and political discourses in industrial and post-industrial societies.

Content: This course gives a broad picture of the changes of work and economy from antiquity to contemporary world. However, the main emphasis of the course will be on the economic development and theories of economy and work in 20th and 21st centuries i.e. the development from the industrial to post-industrial society. In this course we get acquainted with different aspects and meanings given for the work and economy during the history. We learn how different theoretical traditions have explained the concepts of work and economy, and we learn about the main schools of economic theories (classical, neoclassical, Keynesian and Marxian schools). We also consider how different views about work and economy are affecting to social and political reality, and to our everyday lives. This course gives a special emphasis on the new forms of economy and work such as knowledge work, cognitive capitalism, sharing economy, precarious work, expert work and professionalism, commons, peer production, coworking and cultural economy. In general, this course aims to give an interesting and stimulating approach to the question of work and economy, which are many times considered to be difficult and if not even boring branches of social activity.

Mode of study: Lectures, group works and group presentations.

Assessment: Active participation in the lectures and group works, presenting a group work for the class.

Grading: 0-5

Timing: Week III: 3 - 7 June 2019

Class hours: Mon - Tue: 9 - 15, Wed - Fri: 10 - 14

Location: Ag C222

YMAA3170 Managing Customer Relationships with Digital Marketing

by Jyväskylä University School of Business and Economics

Field / subject: Marketing

ECTS credits: 5

Lecturers: Professor Heikki Karjaluoto and University Lecturer Outi Niininen, Jyväskylä University School of Business and Economics

Target group: This course is ideal for Bachelor- level students having studied basics of marketing

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this course, student is able to:

  • Classify different phases of customer relationship management (CRM) strategy
  • Plan, implement and analyze CRM strategies especially in digital environments
  • Explain the basic functions of various software used in managing relationships
  • Explain the characteristics of various digital marketing tactics


Content:
This course introduces the students with the basic and applied principles and concepts of customer relationship management (CRM) in digital environment. The course introduces the students a four phase framework of CRM: 1) Customer acquisition, 2) Growing the value of the customer base , 3) Interacting with customers using digital channels, and 4) Managing digital marketing and sales strategy.  

Topics:

  • Customer Relationship Management (CRM) strategy in Digital Environment
  • Digital customer experience               
  • Social CRM
  • Customer acquisition and identification
  • Interaction in customer relationship communication
  • Customer loyalty
  • Management of different digital relationships
  • Organizational issues in CRM


Mode of study
: Lectures 24 hours, classroom discussions, a written assignment to be completed after the course

Preliminary readings: Article package distributed to the students one week before the lectures

Course literature: Articles and cases announced by the instructors.

Assessment:  Active participation in the lectures and writing an analysis of the articles and cases.

Grading: 0-5

Timing: Week III: 3 - 7 June 2019

Class hours: Mon - Fri: 9.15 - 13.30

Location:
Mon: Ag Delta
Tue: Ag C234
Wed: Ag C231
Thu: Ag C234
Fri: Ag C234

Teaching for quality learning in diverse learning settings

by Faculty of Education

ECTS credits: 3

Lecturer: Katarzyna Kärkkäinen, Postdoctoral researcher, EduCluster Finland

Target group: The course is suitable to all students interested in issues of approaching diversity and teaching for quality learning in diverse settings. Course is on advanced level. Pre-knowledge on matters related to diversity in education and in society is of value; however, it is not required. Students of all subjects and of various backgrounds are welcome.

Working methods: Dialogic lectures, group discussions and group work, reading and assignments to be completed outside course hours, learning diary

Content: The course deals in in-depth way with aspects related to effective teaching and learning in learning settings characterized by diversity. All above students will work to improve their understanding of the context in which individuals with diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds live and learn as well as analyse and critically reflect on own starting points for approaching diversity. The course covers following topics:

  • complexities of diversities existing in each of us
  • social context of teaching and learning of culturally and linguistically diverse groups of students (e.g., migrants’ position and integration in a new country of residence)
  • culture and language aspects vs. personal differences in learning and teaching
  • teaching modes for diverse learning contexts
  • multicultural curriculum development

Aims: On successful completion of this course, students are able to:
•    understand the specifics of learning and living in a new cultural and linguistic context
•    critically reflect on culture and language aspects in education and in society
•    be aware of their own starting points and biases in approaching differences
•    analyze and reflect on their own practices and behaviors in learning settings characterized by increased diversity
•    be aware of and able to use potential pedagogies that enable effective teaching and learning in diverse settings
•    understand the opportunities and challenges that participation in education presents to integration of migrants

Assessment: The course is evaluated with a grading scale from 1 to 5 (0=fail, 1=satisfactory, 3=good, 4= very good, 5 = excellent). The criteria will be discussed in more detail during the first day of the course.

Timing: Week III: 3 - 7 June 2019

Class hours and locations:
Mon: 9.00 – 15:00  Ag C234

Tue: 9.00 - 15.00  Ag C231

Wed: 12.00 – 15.30 Ag Gamma

Thu - Fri: 9.00 –12:30 Ag D211

 

Music, Mind & Well-being

by Department of Music, Art and Culture Studies

Field / subject: Musicology; Music Therapy; Music Psychology, Music Perception & Cognition

ECTS credits: 5

Lecturers: Marc R. Thompson, Olivier Brabant, Department of Music, Art and Culture Studies, University of Jyväskylä, and guests (TBA)

Target group: The course is meant as an introduction to how music is used in life as a tool for well-being, whether in therapy or everyday life. This course is ideal for those studying in the fields of Music, Psychology, Psychotherapy, Cognitive Science, Culture Studies, Arts (however neither music training nor computer programming experience are required). The course will be ideal for students near the end of their Bachelor’s degree, but graduate students are also welcomed.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this course, student is able to

  • Describe psychological processes related to areas such as musical preferences, music and personality, music and movement, music and emotion, and the social psychology of music
  • Identify certain methods used in Music Therapy, and distinguish between active and receptive music therapy.
  • Critically evaluate, compare, and summarize various theoretical propositions and empirical studies related to psychological and social aspects of musical behavior

Content:

  • Introduction to Music Therapy (theoretical and experiential)
  • Introduction to music psychology research (music + emotions, Music and mood regulation)
  • Music + Movement (introducing framework of study and methodology)

Mode of study:

  • 5 hours per day: lectures, group discussions, workshops & tutorials
  • Written assignment to be completed after the course

Suggested readings:

  • Bruscia, K. E. (2014). Defining Music Therapy (3rd ed.). Gilsum, NH: Barcelona.
  • S. Hallam, I. Cross & M. Thaut (eds.) (2009). Oxford Handbook of Music Psychology. OUP. New York.

Course literature: Teacher prepared documents and various academic papers.

Assessment:

  • Active participation (attendance, participation in class activities and discussions
  • Students are given the choice between writing 3 public blog posts or 5 learning diary entries related to the content of the course

Grading: 0-5

Timing: Week III: 3 - 7 June 2019

Class hours:

Mon - Thu: 9.00 – 15.00 
Fri: 9.00 –12.00

Location:

Lectures: Boombox/Fermaatti (M 106.1, 106.2, 104)

Demos: M014, M007

HTKA112 Magic of the Game - Perspectives to Digital Games

by Department of Music, Art and Culture Studies

ECTS credits: 5

Lecturer: Uni­ver­si­ty Teac­her Tanja Välisalo, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Jyväskylä

Target group: The course is aimed at students with an interest in games and playing, and the motivation for taking their interest to an academic context.

Content: The course gives a foundation for understanding games, playing and related phenomena as part of contemporary culture, and familiarizes students with the basics of game studies. The course focuses on games, players and playing from multiple viewpoints with an emphasis on multidisciplinarity. The course contents also give a good foundation for studying game design. 

Learning goals: After successfully completing the course, student

  • understands games in terms of structure, design, ways of playing, game communities and game cultures
  • understands games and playing as a topic of multidisciplinary research
  • knows the central concepts related to games
  • can apply analysis tools to the study of games and playing
  • knows some of the central areas of game studies

Study methods: Lectures, workshops, discussions, individual and group assignments. We will also implement game-based learning methods, including a game design workshop.

Assessment: The course is graded on a scale from 0 to 5 based on active participation and assignments.

Timing: Week III: 3 - 7 June 2019

Class hours:

Mon - Thu: 10.15 - 16.00

Fri: 10.15 - 15.00

Location: D109

XYHX1001 Multilingual communication in multicultural teams

by Language Centre

ECTS credits: 2-3

Lecturers: Lotta Kokkonen, PhD and Teija Natri (Language Centre, University of Jyväskylä) and Kanako Nishizumi, PhD (Chiba University)
  
Learning Outcomes: After successfully completing this course students should be able to:
•    understand different perspectives on language, identity, multilingualism and interculturality
•    understand and recognize emotional reactions such as uncertainty, anxiety, and other phenomena related with intercultural and multilingual encounters
•    be aware of the multilingual and intercultural communication competence needed in multilingual teams and groups
•    participate and engage within multicultural teams

Content: Modern work life calls for multilingual and intercultural communication competencies. Working in many languages and in multilingual contexts is reality for many and multicultural teams and organizations have become ideal when seeking for innovations and creativity. During this course, phenomenon such as language, identity, multilingualism, and interculturality are discussed. The course is conducted in cooperation with the Chiba University / College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. This course aims at understanding of the complexity of the interplay of languages and cultures, and competencies needed in contemporary work life.

Topics:
•    Multilingual and intercultural communication – basic concepts and current trends in research and practise
•    Uncertainty, ambiguity and other relevant phenomena in multilingual communication and intercultural encounters
•    Language and identity
•    Multicultural and multilingual teams
•    Communication competencies / multilingual competence

Mode of study: The pedagogical foundation relies heavily on experiential learning (e.g. Kolb) and active learning (e.g. Bonwell & Eison; Revans). Learning methods include lectures, readings (to be specified later) discussions and exercises during the classes. Further, field visits, individual / group assignments are to be completed during the course, partly outside the lecture hours. Students are encouraged to contribute to the lectures actively through discussions. For 3 ECTS credits, students should complete an additional written learning assignment.

Grading: The course is evaluated with a grading scale from 1 to 5 (0=fail, 1=satisfactory, 3=good, 4= very good, 5 = excellent). The criteria will be discussed in more detail during the first lecture.

Timing: Week IV: 10 - 14 June 2019

Class hours and locations: 

Mon  09:00-12:00   RUU E 214 Onni

Mon  12:00-15:00  RUU E 214 Onni

Tue   09:00-12:00   RUU C 101 Lucina

Tue   12:00-15:00   RUU D 104 Helena

Wed   09:00-12:00   RUU C 101 Lucina

Wed   12:00-15:00   RUU E 307 Katri

Thu   09:00-12:00   Ag C234   

Thu   12:00-15:00   Ag C231   

Fri   09:00-12:00   Ag C233

National Education Systems: Foundations, Frameworks, Structures and Experiences 

by Faculty of Education and Psychology

ECTS credits: 2-3 

Lecturers: Ms. Patricia Sveth, Youngstown State University and Mr. Pasi Ikonen, Faculty of Education and Psychology, University of Jyväskylä 

Target group: This course is ideal for Bachelor- level students majoring in Education, Pedagogy, Teacher Education, Special Education or Educational Leadership

Learning Outcomes: After completing the course students are able to recognize connections between national education systems, individual experiences, educational philosophies and cultural/sociological phenomena.

Content: National educational systems are complex and dynamic entities, with many interdependent elements: legal frameworks, governance structures, and pedagogical foundations. Study of these contrasting elements will provide a high-level introduction to the concept of a national educational system and enable students to situate their knowledge and experience of their own national system in an international context.

Mode of study: Contact hours 20 - 24 including lectures and collaborative group work, a reflective educational biography based on participants experiences and selected educational trends, a written assignment to be completed after the course.

Preliminary readings: Videos of Finnish education system (available on-line), others to be determined

Course literature: to be determined

Assessment: Active participation in the lectures and group work. Writing and presenting a reflective education biography. Formative self-assessment and summative peer feedback as a part of group work

Grading: 0-5

Timing: Week IV: 10 - 14 June 2019

Class hours and locations: 

Mon - Tue: 9.15 - 14.30 S204

Wed: 9.15 - 14.30  E213

Thu: 9.15 - 14.30   E-building

Fri: 9.15 - 14.30  S204

YFIM6001 Visual Research Methods: a creative way to understand contemporary society

by Department of Social Sciences and Philosophy

ECTS credits: 3-4

Lecturers: Rasa Žakevičiūtė (Department of Social Sciences and Philosophy, University of Jyväskylä), Joanna Kędra (PhD, Department of Language and Communication Studies, University of Jyväskylä)

Target group: All students, who want to know about or intend to use visual research methods. No prior knowledge of visual research methods is required.

Mode of study: The course will consist of daily lectures introducing visual research methods, group work and exercises during class and personal homework assignments (for 3 ECTS) and optional learning diary (for 4 ECTS).

Content: Like never before, our life and daily communication have considerably changed towards more visually oriented ones. Thus, any attempt at describing, analyzing and understanding contemporary society should incorporate visuals. This course provides students with an introduction to visual research methods, including participatory visual methods, researcher-generated data and methods of analysis of found images. We will work with photographs, advertisements, drawings, data visualizations and many more. In addition, issues related to research ethics while working with visual material will be discussed. The course provides a number of hands-on activities, in which students practice their research skills both in collecting or generating visual material and in analyzing it with their peers. Foremost, we will try to feel the joy of seeing and discovering meanings in visual research.

Learning outcomes:

On completion of the course students will:

  • gain basic knowledge about various visual research methods and their application across disciplines,
  • be able to choose visual method(s) suitable for their own research topics,
  • know how to conduct research using visual research methods,
  • understand ethical issues in visual research,
  • learn to use visual thinking when approaching visual material,
  • develop their competency in visual literacy, particularly, skills in visual perception, interpretation, evaluation and visual communication.


Assessment:
Active participation, course assignments, learning diary. The course is evaluated with a grading scale from 1 to 5 (0=fail, 5=excellent).

Timing: Week IV: 10 - 14 June 2019

Class Hours: Mon - Thu: 9:15-14:00 (Lunch break 11:30-12:30), Fri: 9:15-13:15 (Lunch break 11:00-12:00)

Location: OPK338

CIPA911 Introduction to Dance Movement Therapy and Other Arts Therapies

by Department of Psychology

ECTS credits: 3

Lecturers: Katriina Hyvönen (PhD, Psychologist, Psychotherapist, Dance Movement Therapist), Päivi Pylvänäinen, (PhD, Psychologist, Dance Movement Therapist)

Target group: This course is ideal for Bachelor- level students majoring in psychology or related fields.

Aims and content:
Dance Movement Therapy, as well as other Arts Therapies, has similar theoretical underpinnings as verbal psychotherapies. Creativity, however, is emphasised and surfaces in the centre of the therapeutic process. To provide a personal experience of creativity in Dance Movement Therapy context, experiential learning is emphasized on this course. Students will have an opportunity to explore and reflect on their own experiences of the movement process. The course includes a theoretical component that provides a brief overview of Dance Movement Therapy within the context of other Arts Therapies (i.e., Art Therapy, Music Therapy, Drama Therapy). Students can make connections between theory and their own movement experiences through the interactions with others, reading of arts therapies literature and writing movement diaries. The course is suited to students interested in exploring their own experiences through body awareness and creative movement. The number of places on the course is limited to 25. Students with prior knowledge of psychology and related fields are given priority. However, no previous dance experience is required and the course does not include physically demanding activities.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this course, students are familiar with basic concepts and theory in Dance Movement Therapy. They understand the concept of body image and its significance in interaction and well-being.  Students will improve their mindfulness skills by practicing observing and describing their sensory and emotional experiences.

Mode of study: Movement workshops, group/pair work and lectures, a written assignment to be completed after the course.

Assessment: Active participation in the lectures and writing a learning log on topics related to the course.

Grading: 0-5

Course literature:

Karkou, V., & Sanderson, P. (2006). Arts therapies: A research-based map of the field. Churchill Livingstone.

Meekums, B. (2005). Dance Movement Therapy: A Creative Psychotherapeutic Approach. London: Sage Publications.

Payne, H. (1992/2006). Dance movement therapy: Theory and practice. London & New York: Routledge.

Punkanen, M. & Saarikallio, S. (2014). Emotions in motion: short-term group form Dance/Movement Therapy in the treatment of depression: a pilot study. The Arts in Psychotherapy, 41, 493–497.

Pylvänäinen, P. (2018). Dance Movement Therapy in the Treatment of Depresssion. Change in Mood and Body Image: A Clinical Practice Based Study. Jyväskylä Studies in Education, Psychology and Social Research 621. https://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/59026

Ylönen, M. & Cantell, M. (2009). Kinaesthetic narratives: Interpretations for children’s dance movement therapy process. Body, Movement and Dance in Psychotherapy, 4, 215–230.

Timing: Week IV: 10 - 14 June 2019

Class hours:
Mon: 10:00-15:00
Tue - Thu: 9:00 - 14:00
Fri: 10:00-14:00

Location: Ryhtilä

LYTA509 Sport Marketing

by Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences

ECTS credits: 2 or 4

Lecturers: Hanna Vehmas, PhD (Senior Lecturer, University of Jyväskylä), Siegfried Nagel, PhD (Professor, University of Bern)

Field / subject: Sport Management and Social Sciences of Sport

Target group: All interested

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this course, student is able to demonstrate an understanding of the elements behind the concepts and models of sport marketing sport event management, sport participation and consumer behaviour, sport technology, and sport related tourism.

Content: The course will introduce students to the concepts and theory of sport participation, sport marketing, sport event management and sport related tourism. Under the expert guidance of international lecturers, the fundamental reasoning of these topics will be discussed and applied to specific practical cases.

Modes of Study: Lectures 18 hours, independent work 6 hours and seminars 3 hours and seminar presentation (group assignment) and a written assignment to be completed after the course (independent learning log).

Modes of Completion: Learning log and group assignment: 2ECTS credits. Additional 2 credits for the individual assignment.

Assessment: Active participation in the lectures and seminar, seminar presentation (50%) and writing an independent learning log on topics related to the course (50%).

Grading: 0-5

Timing: Week IV: 10 - 14 June 2019

Class hours: Mon - Fri: 9 -16

Location: L346, L206A

Ear Training - Blended Learning

by Department of Music, Art and Culture Studies

ECTS credits: 3

Lecturers: Mónika Benedek and Markku Pöyhönen (Moodle), Department of Music, Art and Culture Studies, University of Jyväskylä

Target group: The course is for students from any disciplines, who are interested in developing aural skills, music theory and stylistic knowledge of classical and early romantic music, and improvisation skills. The very basic musical skills in musical reading and writing, fundamentals of music theory and basic experience of playing any instruments in any musical styles are the only requirements of the course. The course uses blended learning approaches, however neither online nor blended learning experience in music are required. 

Also students from e.g. Bachelor and Master studies and programmes of Music, Art and Culture Studies or Music Education, Musicology, Teacher Education and Music Therapy are warmly welcome.

Content: The blended ear-training course is a comprehensive ear-training consisting of daily face-to face group lessons and online-learning platform via Moodle.

• The course material is selected from the classical and early romantic musical periods in order to train the musical ear in particular styles.

• Activities of face-to face group lessons will be singing, playing, listening, improvising together in order to learn musical style, music theory in practice and developing aural skills               

• Activities of online learning platform will be listening, aural and score analysis, writing, composing, ‘singing and playing-along’ with the recording and short assignments.

Learning Outcomes: By the end of the course students will experience development in their:
• aural skills, musical hearing
• practical musicianship skills such as playing and improvisation
• stylistic knowledge
• musical reading skills and understand music better from score
• knowledge of music theory: they will be able to identify various element of classical and early romantic music melody, rhythm, harmony, scales, musical forms etc. by ear and from the written score

Modes of Study:
• 4 hours group lesson per day
• private online learning and rehearsals/Moodle
• Written assignments to be completed after the course

Course literature: Teacher prepared documents and online learning material of Moodle

Completion Mode: Active participation in
• Face-to-face group lessons 
• Online work in Moodle - including short daily assignments and daily feedback of the course via Moodle
• Written assignments to be completed after the course

Grading: 0-5

Timing: Week IV: 10 - 14 June 2019

Class hours: Mon - Fri: 12-16

Location: Mon - Fri: M007 (Musica-building)